Notes From Honduras – September 2017

Before the Spanish arrived to colonize Honduras, the land was inhabited by a variety of indigenous tribes. Most prominently, the Mayans occupied the western region of Copán. Other indigenous tribes including the Lenca, Miskito, Tawahka, Pech, Tolupan, and Chortis were scattered throughout the country.

After a few “discoveries” in the early 1500s, Honduras was colonized in 1524 and under Spanish rule for the next three centuries.

On September 15, 1821, a declaration of independence was signed in Guatemala City and Honduras, along with the four other Central American countries (El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica) were granted independence from Spain.

In Honduras and across Central America, all of September is celebrated as the Mes de la Patria (Month of National Celebration), beginning with Dia de la Bandera (Day of the Flag) on September 1st and Dia de la Independencia (Independence Day) on September 15th. Schools, office buildings, and stores are decorated in blue and white representing the colors of the national flag of Honduras, and marching bands can be heard every afternoon around the country as they practice for the Independence Day parades.

All four of El Hogar’s centers participated in activities for Independence Day.

(Clockwise from the left) Fernanda, Patric, Estiven Emmanuel, Rony Estiven, Rony Lara, and other students from El Hogar’s Elementary School march in the 2017 parade celebrating Honduran Independence Day.

From the Agricultural School, some of the boys went into Talanga, the town close by, to watch the local parade. They also decorated their campus with the patriotic blue and white, as well as posters and murals of national symbols and heroes of their past.

Students from the Technical Institute participated in a parade with the elementary school in their town. Starting at the main highway, they marched the roads that lead to the Institute with a marching band, a pelotón (marching platoon), and the honor roll students. The streets were muddy from the rain the night before, but the boys toughed it out!

The elementary students marched in the local parade with the other 24 schools in their district. The marching band set the pace for the rest of the kids, which included the pelotón (marching platoon), palillonas (baton twirlers), and pomponeras (cheerleaders). Accompanied by the high school girls, the children marched in the hot morning sun and their band received an honorable mention from the judges.

– Erika Skafel, Coordinator of North American Relations

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